Don’t Over-Complicate a Simple Thing

 

It was a simple thing, really.

Buy some coffee and freely offer it to people standing in line for an event. Just say “Good morning,” exchange a few pleasantries, and move up the line.

But it was more than that. But not that much more.

Tim Weston Serving Others

Tim Weston Serving Others

I met Tim Weston as I was waiting to go into the auditorium for the second day of the 2015 World Domination Summit. He was walking up the line of attendees who were queued up, waiting for the doors to open.

Throughout its five-year history, the staff of WDS is legendary for providing unexpected surprises and comforts for those in attendance. But I noticed that Tim was wearing the blue name badge of an attendee and not the orange badge of a volunteer. It was not Tim’s job as a volunteer host to create an exceptional experience for the attendees in line.

 

Yet here he was, doing just that. He had purchased a container of coffee and was giving it away to anyone who need a cup. I asked him why.

Tim said he figured some people would have been standing in line for over an hour and might have missed getting coffee. Or maybe someone might just need a lift. Plus, as an introvert, it gave him an excuse to go up to people and speak to them. An effort to break through his own shyness, combined with a simple, thoughtful gesture to serve other people.

Tim didn’t tell anyone he bought the coffee or why he was doing it. He didn’t turn a spotlight on himself. He focused instead on serving others.

It was a simple gesture that well encapsulated the three tenets of WDS:

Community – Tim was thinking of other attendees waiting in line.

Service – He took action on behalf of them.

Adventure – It’s always an adventure when you sail into the waters of meeting people in unconventional ways, especially as an introvert.

Tim didn’t over complicate a simple process of meeting people and giving a piece of himself in service.

Tim was my hero for the day and provided a lesson in kindness that I’ll remember and emulate. Most of the time I make things more difficult than they have to be and muddle them up in the process.

I like it when my lessons come with a little cream and sugar. Thanks, Tim!

 

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